G-WADI's mission is to strengthen the capacity to manage the water resources of arid and semi-arid areas around the globe through a network of international and regional cooperation. 


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    G-WADI Training Workshop

    G-WADI Training Workshop on “Advances in Water Resources Management in Arid and Semi-Arid Areas: A G-WADI approach” February 17th – 18th, 2016

    The Global Conference of the Global Network on Water and Development Information for Arid Lands (G-WADI) established in Beijing, China during the period 25 to 27 October 2016.

    The theme of the conference was “G-WADI more than a decade enhancing water and sustainable development for arid regions”. This conference was organized by the International Hydrological Programme (IHP) of UNESCO

    The goal of the G-WADI network was to promote the global capacity for management of water resources in arid and semi-arid areas. By building this global network, regional and international cooperation enhanced and increase knowledge and improve management practices through the sharing of information.

    “Global G-WADI Advisory Committee Meeting

    “Global G-WADI Advisory Committee Meeting” 17-19th February, 2016 four Regional G-WADI Secretariats participated: Arab G-WADI, African G-WADI, Asian G-WADI, European G-WADI

    Background

    Training workshop on  “advances in water resources management in arid and semi-arid areas: A G-WADI  approach” February 17th-18th , 2016.

    Global G-WADI Advisory Committee Meeting , 19th  February,2016

    Arid and Semi-Arid Areas: A G-WADI

    Participants:

    Lecturers include senior prominent Authorities in their Fields. Participants from: France, UK, Egypt, Ethiopia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Serbia, Germany, India, USA, China, Japan and Sudan.

    The workshop has been honored by H.E the Minister of WRIE, the Vice Chancellor of U of K, The Secretary of NATCOM and Head of UNESCO Office Khartoum.

    Objectives:

    To train senior professionals on advanced subjects and tools related to Water Resources Management in Arid and Semi-Arid areas.

    Outcomes:      

    – A variety of advanced concepts have been presented and discussed

    – Better insight of the advances and powerful tools has been achieved

    – Capacity development and networking

    – The future direction of activities of the G-WADI network has been agreed

    Advanced training Workshop

    Cooperation Facility Arab/ African IHP – NATCOMs and G-WADI Coordination initiative for website Development and Training”(09-11 June 2015).

    An initiative for coordination’s between the Arab and African IHP NATCOMs as well as G-WADI from both regions. The Project is executed by RCWH under the IHP-NATCOM1

    Participants:

    From Egypt, Kenya, Sultanate of Oman, Ethiopia, Nigeria and Sudan

    Objectives:

    – Enhance Knowledge experience among Arab/African NATCOMs.

    – Promote IHP in the Arab/African regions

    – Introduce regional IHP activities

    – Share technical documents publications

    – Announce training program

    Outcomes:

    – A website has developed (www.arab-ihp) in 3 languages (Arabic, English and French).

    – 30 Experts have been trained.

    – Forming and enhancing a networking among the Arab/ African IHP and G-WADI.

     

     

    7th University of Khartoum Graduate

    7th University of Khartoum Graduate College Conference on Science, Technology and Innovation for Sustainable Development in Africa 19 – 23 Feb, 2016 G-WADI Global Conference “G-WADI more than a decade enhancing water and sustainable development for arid regions”

    The Global Conference of the Global Network on Water and Development Information for Arid Lands (G-WADI) established in Beijing, China during the period 25 to 27 October 2016.

    The theme of the conference was “G-WADI more than a decade enhancing water and sustainable development for arid regions”. This conference was organized by the International Hydrological Programme (IHP) of UNESCO

    The goal of the G-WADI network was to promote the global capacity for management of water resources in arid and semi-arid areas. By building this global network, regional and international cooperation enhanced and increase knowledge and improve management practices through the sharing of information.

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    News

    • May 23, 2018

      ARAB G-WADI NETWORK MEETS TO DISCUSS PRIORITIES

      The General Secretariat of the Arab Network for the Management of Water Resources in the Arid and Semi-Arid Regions of the Sultanate of Oman, in coordination and cooperation with the UNESCO Cairo Office, held the third general meeting of the Arab Network in Muscat, Sultanate of Oman from 17-19 September 2017.

      The meeting participants discussed the performance of the network since the last meeting, support for the Network, strengthening the links among the members, and cooperation and coordination with other international and regional networks.

      Network members also developed a list of priorities for the next several years. These included work on:

      • Water-related disasters and hydrological changes, including flash flooding in wadis and the potential impacts of climate change on water resources;
      • Groundwater in a changing environment, including its protection, use of traditional knowledge in water management, and managed aquifer recharge;
      • Water scarcity and quality, including integrated and sustainable water resources governance, improving water use efficiency, water harvesting and the water-food-energy nexus;
      • Water and human settlements in the future, including water treatment and desalination; and
      • Ecohydrology and water education.
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    • NEW STRATEGIC PLAN DEVELOPED FOR G-WADI

      http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0025/002594/259497e.pdf . The lead author is Dr. Wouter Buytaert of Imperial College, London.

      This paper gives a condensed overview of the achievements of G-WADI including the developments of tools and platforms to assist water managers during hydrologic extremes, as well as capacity-building efforts undertaken to date. It also notes G-WADI’s strengths as a global network supporting the science-policy interface, and catalyzing high-level research to address water management issues with direct relevance at the local level of management, planning, and policy. It then provides a critical reflection of the challenges that face G-WADI as well as new opportunities within the changing landscape of scientific research, water management and policymaking of arid and semi-arid zones.

      The report makes clear that the regional networks play a crucial role in the future success of G-WADI, noting that “Through their network and connections to local policy, they are best placed to identify specific bottlenecks for a sustainable development of arid and semi-arid regions. As such, they should set the agenda and ensure that the scientific process is optimally demand-driven, and is turned into tools and products that address those local demands”. The regional centers are also well placed to identify training opportunities as well as by identifying common interests and priorities among regional centers and networks.

      The report suggests that G-WADI engage in new scientific trends, such as the hydrology-society interactions identified in IAHS’ Panta Rhei decade—for the science itself, but also as a pathway to increasing the societal relevance and impact of G-WADI research and training. Another trend to engage is the increasing interest in participatory approaches, grassroots initiatives and citizen science. With the increasing availability and adoption of information, communications and mobile technologies, existing or new G-WADI tools could leverage these technologies and provide a broader range of climate services.

      These endeavors will require mobilization of additional financial and other resources by identifying funding opportunities within the scope of G-WADI’s priorities, and the assembling of international consortia of scientists and end-users to formulate successful proposals.

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    • AFRICAN FLOOD AND DROUGHT MONITOR FINDS APPLICATIONS IN HEALTH, EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MIGRATION STUDIES

      Developed by Princeton University’s Terrestrial Hydrology Group in collaboration with UNESCO IHP, G-WADI secretariats and members, regional centers, the African Flood and Drought Monitor (AFDM) monitors and forecasts meteorological, agricultural and hydrological drought at various temporal and spatial scales. It also has a multi-decadal, historical reconstruction of the terrestrial water cycle against which current conditions can be compared.

      Some of the applications of the AFDM were foreseen by its developers, but researchers and international development specialists are finding ways to use the monitor in many creative ways. In the last two years alone, AFDM data and information have been used for:

      Drought Resilience: Controlling for drought variables with the AFDM helped USAID establish that a) the overall shock exposure in Niger vs. Burkina Faso during their RISE study was due to insect invasions and food price increases, not climate; and b) their market-based interventions in the PRIME program in Ethiopia were effective.

      Impact of Irrigation Dams: Use of AFDM drought indices helped show that in northern Nigeria households downstream of the dams were less affected by drought and enjoyed more stable growth rates and food consumption than those upstream or in similar but undammed basins.

      Human migration: Rainfall shortages and excess temperature, with soil moisture as an additional important factor, are strong drivers of out-migration from South Africa, especially for black and low-income migrants.

      Health and Epidemiology: a) Temperature drives both tsetse fly relative abundance and trypanosome prevalence in Tanzania; b) Risk of cholera transmission in Cameroon varies with average daily maximum temperature and with the precipitation levels over the preceding two weeks.

      References for these applications are available upon request.

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    • G-WADI Finds Success in Merging High

      Satellite-based precipitation estimates (SPE) are becoming valuable sources of rainfall data for hydrologic

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